Tuesday, 22 July 2014
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More U.S. citizens live in neighborhoods governed by homeowners (HOAs) or neighborhood associations (NAs) than in any period of American history. Property values are typical association goals. Research fails to consider all types of associations in the examination of the effects of neighborhood governance on property values. In this article, I study the effects of HOAs and NAs on property values. I find that HOAs increase property values, while NAs exert no influence on property values.

We quantify how social detachment (measured as neither working nor attending school) of low-income African-American and Latino young adults relates to their teen neighborhood conditions. Data come from retrospective surveys of Denver Housing Authority (DHA) households. Because DHA household allocation mimics quasirandom assignment to neighborhoods throughout Denver County, this program represents a natural experiment for overcoming geographic selection bias. Our multilevel, mixed-effects logistic analyses found significant relationships between neighborhood safety and population composition and odds of social detachment of low-income, minority young adults that can be interpreted as causal effects. The strength of these relationships was often contingent on gender and ethnicity, however. We draw conclusions for macroeconomic, income-support, subsidized housing and community development policy.

School reform politics in England and the United States over the last quarter century has revolved largely around the question of performance-based accountability. Accountability school reform in both countries has entailed standardization of curricula and assessment and the spread in the use of market mechanisms in school governance. To explain how these accountability reforms have retooled local governing institutions in ways that have reduced their autonomy and lessened their capacity to administer local school systems, this article applies the analytical framework of urban governing cycles to a comparative study of school reform politics in Bristol, England, and Boston, Massachusetts.

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PlaceMaking NZ
 
Placemaking NZ was established back in 2010 by a group which included local government employees and consultants.
 
The organisation has hosted several forums and gained a following from the built urban environment community.
Its regular communication with members has been by an online newsletter.
 
During 2012 the organisation has expanded its marketing reach by striking a partnership arrangement with Mediaweb, publishers of NZ Local Government magazine.
 
Regular placemaking features are scheduled for April, July and October's issues, and this will be a huge boost for profile.
 
ICTC members are invited to follow placemaking developments in NZ and Australia and are encouraged to subscribe to the placemaking newsletter.
 
Complimentary copies of NZ LG magazine are available to anyone who is a newsletter subscriber.

 

 
Placemaking NZ was established back in 2010 by a group which included local government employees and consultants.
 
The organisation has hosted several forums and gained a following from the built urban environment community.
Its regular communication with members has been by an online newsletter.
 
During 2012 the organisation has expanded its marketing reach by striking a partnership arrangement with Mediaweb, publishers of NZ Local Government magazine.
 
Regular placemaking features are scheduled for April, July and October's issues, and this will be a huge boost for profile.
 
ICTC members are invited to follow placemaking developments in NZ and Australia and are encouraged to subscribe to the placemaking newsletter.
 
Complimentary copies of NZ LG magazine are available to anyone who is a newsletter subscriber.

 

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If you wish to view past papers, please login to the site by entering your User Name & Password in the "Member Login" box above.  If you do not have a User Name & Password, please click on register in the "Member Login" box to register or re-new your membership - there is no charge.