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Many counties in the U.S. federalist system have morphed from a limited role in service delivery to a workhorse for municipal-style local government. They also facilitate development and sprawl, helping to shape development patterns of the modern fragmented metropolis. Why do counties accommodate development demand that deviates from long-term land-use plans intended to prevent sprawl? Utilizing panel data of county land-use changes in Florida, this study finds evidence that the decisions are shaped by both external competition for growth and internal institutional incentives. Fragmentation fuels more leapfrog development patterns on the urban fringe. Horizontal fragmentation encourages counties to compete for development, whereas vertical fragmentation via special districts facilitates such development through provision of services and reducing pressure for public officeholders to raise taxes. However, these fragmentation effects are also influenced by modernized institutions in counties such as home-rule charters and form of government.

This article examines the effects of accomplishments on the career paths of big-city mayors. Using data from 104 cities with populations over 160,000 from 1992 to 2012, this study examines the extent to which performance in economics, crime, and recruiting mega-events affects mayors’ decisions to seek reelection or other offices, or retire. Results indicate those mayors of cities with population growth, a decrease in the crime rate, and that host certain mega-events (presidential nominating conventions) are more likely to seek another office than other mayors. A decrease in the crime rate seems to help mayors win reelection while none of the other accomplishments appear to improve their chances of winning campaigns for other offices.

What drives budgetary support for minority-targeted policies? This question is increasingly salient because the public sector serves numerous minority clientele. One perspective suggests that budgetary decisions are grounded in need or demand, while another contends that political pressures will result in the allocation of resources to those with political power. This article presents a theory of budgetary allocation based on the interaction between politics and professionalism, two seemingly disparate perspectives. Furthermore, we separate professionalism into two dimensions—demand and need. Through an analysis of budgeting decisions for bilingual education, we find that political representation leads to more positive budgetary changes for low-demand and, conversely, high-need environments. These findings support not only the interaction between politics and professionalism as a driver of budgetary outcomes but also the theory of two dimensions of professionalism.

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ICTC Conference 9-11 Nov 2016   |  Launceston, Tasmania
Future Places: Conflict in Harmony

Register now - click here.
  Earlybird closes 8 July 2016.

The 16th International Cities Town Centres & Communities Conference features over 80 world-class presentations from city planning, place making, economic development and innovation specialists from Australia, Europe, UK, New Zealand and USA.. 

Visit the
ICTC 2016 conference webpage to view:
- 3 day conference program
- Keynote speakers including Gehl Architects, Deloitte & Cisco.
- Pre-conference masterclasses
- Field Trips and pop-up walk
- Accommodation
- Activities and things to do in Tasmania

Enquiries E: events@ictcsociety.org | T: +61 7 3161 5901

Host ICTC 2017
 or 2018 Conference

Nominate your city now click here. 
Nominations are now open for your city to host the next ICTC Conference.

 

 

 

 
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